THE BRAVE ONE

 REVIEW BY DAVE SMITH

Way back in 1931 the Motion Picture Production Code (administered by Indiana's Will Hays) stated..."No picture shall be produced which will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience shall never be thrown to the side of crime, wrong-doing, evil, or sin." There was also a dictum which said that there must be "compensation for an 'immoral' act." Amazingly this code was in effect for 40 years! Lucky for Neil Jordan and Jody Foster we are no longer governed by this puritanical code.

In this film Jody Foster murders at least six people and gets away with it. Foster is a very intelligent woman but she sometimes uses bad judgment in selecting her screen roles. Why she ever did a remake of The King and I is beyond me. She is always good as an actress but the vehicle is sometimes weak. Perhaps she trusted director Neil Jordan who gave us The Crying Game and Michael Collins. In turn, Jordan may have trusted his writers too much. This film is carried solely by Jody Foster's acting and Neil Jordan's directing. They try valiantly to overcome the screenplay but in the end...especially in the end...they fail.

Foster plays a modern day Charles Bronson vigilante. Her fiance is murdered by three thugs in Central Park. She is beaten senseless and is in a coma for three weeks. When she recovers and goes home, she is afraid to leave her apartment. When she does, she immediately decides to buy a gun...no longer trusting the streets of New York. Of course buying a gun is a simple thing in America where it seems everyone is selling one on a street corner. She learns to shoot and is unexpectedly faced with a chance to use the gun when she visits a convenience store in which she witnesses a husband killing his wife. After dispatching the husband, she returns to her apartment and finds she now has the courage to let a couple of punks on a subway have it.

Enter the good detective, played very well by Terrence Howard. He listens to Foster on her radio show and becomes intrigued. He meets her and they hit it off. They play cat and mouse games with each other until Howard begins to suspect that Foster may be the vigilante. The worst thing about this film is the ending. There were snickers throughout the theater when this film concluded. Surely Neil Jordan could have come up with a better ending. It is not only illogical, it is ridiculous. The film might have been better with a good ending...but not much better.

 


 

All contents of this website 2000-2008 by David L. Smith

"When Movies Were Movies" and "Hoosiers in Hollywood" are registered trademarks, fully protected under U.S. and International law. Use without permission is strictly prohibited.

 

Home |Silents Please! |The Golden Age |Current Films |Hoosiers in Hollywood |Movie Music  |About Me |Links |Linking to the Site |Guestbook |Contact Dave

 

 

All contents of this website 2000-2008 by David L. Smith

"When Movies Were Movies" and "Hoosiers in Hollywood" are  registered trademarks, fully protected under U.S. and International law. Use without permission is strictly prohibited.

 

Home |Silents Please! |The Golden Age |Current Films |Hoosiers in Hollywood |Movie Music | |About Me |Links |Linking to the Site |Guestbook |Contact Dave